Exploring The Use of Thorium to Meet India’s Power Needs and the Potential Feasibility of Assistance for Funds

Akshat Maheshwari, Prakhar Srivastava, Priyanka Amod Patwardhan

Abstract


Abstract: The total Nominal GDP of India in 2016 stands at $2.30 Trillion, and PPP at $8.64 Trillion. The growth rate of the GDP in the 4th Quarter of Fiscal Year 2015-16 remained at an exemplary 7.9%, all that at a time when the world economy is facing tough situations of recurring crises. However, this newly industrialised economy faces several challenges, which if not addressed can adversely impact its growth trajectory. One of the primary challenges is power supply. Thousands of villages in our nation, it being the 21st century, are still not electrified. While many data suggest that there is power supply at some of those places, the actual situation is only a converse or a modicum. At present, India’s power needs are colossal. Nuclear energy, in a scenario like this comes up as the best alternative to the quandary. The many advantages of nuclear power plants over other sources of energy, and India’s feasibility to them makes it the best of options. As a matter of fact, India has 25% of the world’s total Thorium reserves, which it not just need to exhaust but put to use as well. However, implementation is a mammoth task which requires handsome amount of funding. This research paper essentially focuses on the fact that with financial assistance from external agencies like the World Bank, India may very soon become sufficient in power supply. The paper will at length discuss the feasibility of procuring financial assistance based on client history and how it will prove instrumental in solving the severe problem of power shortage in India.



Keywords


Keywords: Power Shortage, Nuclear Energy, Thorium, World Bank

Full Text:

PDF

References


Albert J Juhasz, Richard A Rarick, and Rajmohan Rangrajan, 2009, High Efficiency Nuclear power plants using Liquid Fluoride reactor technology, Prepared for Seventh International Energy Conversion Engineering Conference, October 2009

Alex Galperin, Paul Reichert, and Alwin Radkowsky, 1997, Science and Global Security, Thorium Fuel for Light Water reactors-reducing proliferation potential of Nuclear power fuel cycle

Ankur Omer, Smarajit Ghosh, and Rajnish Kaushik, 2013, Indian Power System: Issues and Opportunities, International Journal of Advanced Research in Electrical, Electronics, and Instrumentation Engineering, March 2013

Himachalam Dasaraju and Kota Sreenivasa Murthy, 2011, Efficiency of Indian Power Sector an Analysis of its Performance and Problems, IJMBS Volume 1 Issue 3, September 2011

Hunt Alcott, Allen Collard Wexler, Stephen D O’Connel, 2014, how do Electricity Shortages affect productivity? Evidence from India, New York University and NBER, City University of New York, March 24, 2014

Lynann Butkiewicz, 2012, India’s Electricity crisis: Background on the issues, The National Bureau of Asian Research, August 07, 2014

Mariam Golden and Brian Min, 2012, Theft and Loss of Electricity in an Indian state, Journal of the International Growth Centre

Michel Lung, 1996, Perspectives of the Thorium fuel cycle, Seminar at the JRC-ISPRA, July 02, 1996

R.K Sinha and A Kakoodkar, 2005, Design and Development of A.H.W.R-The Indian Thorium fuel innovative nuclear reactor, Nuclear Engineering and Design, September 26, 2005

Robert Hargraves and Ralph Moir, 2010, Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactors, American Scientist-The magazine of Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society

Steve Thomas, 2005, The Economics of Nuclear power, Nuclear power: Myth and Reality English version

Websites

carnegieendowment.org/2016/06/30/india-s-nuclear-force-structure-2025-pub-63988

documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/Italy-Senn-Nuclear-Power-Plant-Project

garv.gov.in/garv2/dashboard/main/

m.greenpeace.org/international/en/high/news/blogs/nuclear-reaction/the-mythologies-of-thorium-and-uranium/blog/

m.indiatoday.en/story/worlds-first-thorium-based-nuclear-reactor-barc/one/

m.thehindubusinessline.com/specials/india-file/india-file-tangled-in-definition/

thoriumsr.com/intro/pros-and-cons-list/

worldatlas.com/articles/the-largest-uranium-reserves-in-the-world/

www.dianuke.com/?s=Thorium/Thorium-fuel-no-panacea-for-nuclear-power

www.enterprisesurveys.org

www.finmin.nic.in

www.powermin.nic.in/en/content/rural-electrification

www.quora.com/why-arent-thoriun-nucelar-reactors-widely-used

www.thehindu.com/data/Many-dont-have-power-in-power-surplus-India

www.triplepundit.com

www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/indias-huge-need-for-electricity-is-a-problem-for-the-planet

www.whatisnuclear.com

www.yourarticlelibrary.com/essay/essay-on-energy-crisis

Newspaper Articles and other Media Reports

Annie Gowen, India’s huge need of electricity is a problem for the planet, The Washington Post, November 06, 2016

Anupama Airy, India needs nuclear power, The Hindustan Times,

India doesn’t lag in developing Thorium-fuelled nuclear-reactors, The Economic Times, May 29, 2016

Jaideep A Prabhu, Fast forwarding to Thorium, The Hindu, November 18, 2016

Let there be Light, The Telegraph, April 25, 2009

M.G Devasahayam, Abating power crises-manage supply as per need, The Hindu, March 05,2012

Rahul Tongia, Electrified but without Electricity, The Hindu, September 06, 2016

Rising from the Ashes, The Indian Express, April 15, 2010

Sanjay Mehdudia, Power Scenario looks grim, The Hindu, July 06, 2012

T Ramakrishnan, Vital needs for power capacity addition, The Hindu, June 13, 2011

Vidhi Doshi, The lonely struggle of India’s anti-nuclear protesters, The Guardian, June 06, 2016

Yoginder K Alagh, The Thorium route, The Indian Express, March 15, 2011


Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.