Psychological State Of Mothers During Post-Partum Period

Kanza Farrukh, Nawal Munir, Maleeha Iftikhar

Abstract


Abstract

Objective :

The aim of this study is to explore psychological functioning and mental representation in mothers during their post-partum period.

Setting and Design

The study design was observational cross- sectional based.

Subject and Method

70 women, in their post partum period were included in this study. Systematic Random Sampling technique was adopted. The data was analyzed using SPSS version 20.

Conclusions

An environment that is conducive to the personal development of mother and optimal development of child is necessary for the peace and prosperity of society as a whole. Therefore, we as a nation must pay attention on mental health of mother during pregnancy as well as after child-birth by arranging special counselling session for parents.


Keywords


Psychological State of Mothers, Post-Partum Period

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References


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