F. Scott Fitzgerald: The Jazz Age and The Great Gatsby

Rupali Mirza

Abstract


Fitzgerald wrote the work “Echoes of the Jazz Age” due to which he became the main exponent of the Jazz Age theory. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald is a society progressing steadily towards the achievement of the American Dream. The society of the 1920s better known as the Jazz Age was significant for its commodity culture. This new heterogeneous crowd was fast changing the American society posing a challenge to James Gatz and becoming responsible for his transformation to The Great Gatsby. The Woman of the Jazz Age was busy chasing her material dreams without realizing that she had lost all her chastity in this quest. . The women of the Jazz Age were best depicted in the characters of Daisy Buchanan, Myrtle Wilson and Jordan Baker. The woman of this age was characterized by greed, materialism, lust and selfishness. It is these trends of the Jazz Age that exemplify the myth of the American Dream.


Keywords


Jazz Age, American Dream, materialism, selfishness, myth

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References


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